Home | Community | Message Board


Sporeworks
Please support our sponsors.

Community >> Other Growables

Welcome to the Growery Message Board! You are experiencing a small sample of what the site has to offer. Please login or register to post messages and view our exclusive members-only content. You'll gain access to additional forums, file attachments, board customizations, encrypted private messages, and much more!

Amazon Shop for: Papaver Somniferum, Toilet Paper

Jump to first unread post. Pages: 1 | 2 | Next >  [ show all ]
OfflineSoLiTuDE
Registered: 05/15/08
Posts: 1
Last seen: 8 years, 6 months
poppies
    #31147 - 05/15/08 10:26 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

hey, do any of y'all have experience with growing poppies? I'm curious as to how long they take to grow, how to grow them extra big, how many crops can grow in a season, etc? thanks..


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblebmiles
artist
Female
Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 822
Loc: illinois
Re: poppies [Re: SoLiTuDE]
    #31291 - 05/16/08 01:18 AM (8 years, 6 months ago)

http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/4016118#4016118
Check that out.


Edit: removed https from URL so everyone can access the link.


Edited by geokills (05/16/08 01:28 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflinegeokillsA
······· º¿° ·······
Male User Gallery

Registered: 05/08/01
Posts: 1,260
Loc: city of angels
Last seen: 14 days, 15 hours
Re: poppies [Re: bmiles]
    #31294 - 05/16/08 01:28 AM (8 years, 6 months ago)

The original post:
Quote:

Wiccan_Seeker said:
POPPIES -- FROM POPPYSEED TO OPIUM


Opium is the name for the latex produced within the seed pods of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum. The plant is believed to have evolved from a wild strain, Papaver setigerum, which grows in coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. Through centuries of cultivation and breeding for opium, the species somniferum evolved. Today, P. somniferum is the only species of Papaver used to produce opium. Opium contains morphine, codeine, noscapine, papaverine, and thebaine. All but thebaine are used clinically as analgesics to reduce pain without a loss of consciousness. Thebaine is without analgesic effect but is of great pharmaceutical value due to its use in the production of semisynthetic opioid morphine analogues such as oxycodone (Percodan), dihydromorphenone (Dilaudid), and hydrocodone (Vicodin).

The psychological effects of opium may have been known to the ancient Sumerians (circa 4,000 B.C.) whose symbol for poppy was hul, "joy" and gil, "plant". The plant was known in Europe at least 4,000 years ago as evidenced by fossil remains of poppy seed cake and poppy pods found in the Neolithic Swiss Lake Dwellings. Opium was probably consumed by the ancient Egyptians and was known to the Greeks as well. Our word opium is derived from the Greek. The poppy is also referred to in Homer's works the Iliad and the Odyssey (850 B.C.). Hippocrates (460-357 B.C.) prescribed drinking the juice of the white poppy mixed with the seed of nettle.

The opium poppy probably reached China about the fourth century A.D. through Arab traders who advocated its use for medicinal purposes. In Chinese literature, there are earlier references to its use. The noted Chinese surgeon Hua To of the Three Kingdoms (220-264 A.D.) used opium preparations and Cannabis indica for his patients to swallow before undergoing major surgery.

The beginning of widespread opium use in China is associated with the introduction of tobacco smoking in pipes by Dutch from Java in the 17th century. The Chinese mixed Indian opium with the tobacco, two products that were being traded by the Dutch. This practice was adopted throughout the region and predictably resulted in increased opium smoking, both with and without tobacco.

By the late-1700s the British East India Company controlled the prime Indian poppy growing regions and dominated the Asian opium trade. By 1800, they had a monopoly on opium; controlling supply and setting prices.

In 1805, the German pharmacist Friedrich W. Serturner isolated and described the principal alkaloid and powerful active ingredient in opium. He named it morphium after Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams. We know it today as morphine. This event was soon followed by the discovery of other alkaloids of opium: codeine in 1832 and papaverine in 1848. By the 1850s these pure alkaloids, rather than the earlier crude opium preparations, were being commonly prescribed for the relief of pain, cough, and diarrhea. This period also saw the invention and introduction of the hypodermic syringe.

By the late eighteenth century opium was being heavily used in China as a recreational drug. The Imperial court had banned its use and importation but large quantities were still being smuggled into China. In 1839 the Qing Emperor ordered his minister Lin Zexu to address the opium problem. Lin petitioned Queen Victoria for help but was ignored. In reaction, the emperor confiscated 20,000 barrels of opium and detained some foreign traders. The British retaliated by attacking the port city of Canton. Thus the First Opium War began. The Chinese were defeated and the Treaty of Nanjing was signed in 1842. The British required that the opium trade be allowed to continue, that the Chinese pay a large settlement, and that the Chinese cede Hongkong to the British Empire. The Second Opium War began and ended in 1856 over western demands that opium markets be expanded. The Chinese were again defeated and opium importation to China was legalized.

In the United States during the 19th century, opium preparations and 'patent medicines' containing opium extract such as paregoric (camphorated tincture of opium) and laudanum (deodorized opium tincture) became widely available and quite popular. In the 1860s morphine was used extensively pre- and post-operatively as a painkiller for wounded soldiers during the Civil War. Civil War physicians frequently dispensed opiates. In 1866 the Secretary of War stated that during the war the Union Army was issued 10 million opium pills, over 2,840,000 ounces of other opiate preparations (such as laudanum or paregoric), and almost 30,000 ounces of morphine sulphate. The inevitable result was opium addiction, called the 'army disease' or the 'soldier's disease.' These opium and morphine addiction problems prompted a scientific search for potent but nonaddictive painkillers. In the 1870s, chemists synthesized a supposedly non-addictive, substitute for morphine by acetylating morphine. In 1898 the Bayer pharmaceutical company of Germany was the first to make available this new drug, 3,6-diacetylmorphine, in large quantities under the trademarked brand name Heroin. 3,6-diacetylmorphine is two to three times more potent than morphine. Most of the increase is due to its increased lipid solubility, which provides enhanced and rapid central nervous system penetration.

In December 1914, the United States Congress passed the Harrison Narcotics Act which called for control of each phase of the preparation and distribution of medicinal opium, morphine, heroin, cocaine, and any new derivative that could be shown to have similar properties. It made illegal the possession of these controlled substances. The restrictions in the Harrison Act were most recently redefined by the Federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970. The Act lists as a Schedule II Controlled Substance opium and its derivatives and all parts of the P. somniferum plant except the seed.

In 1997, Southeast Asia still accounts for well over half of the world's opium production. It is estimated that the region has the capacity to produce over 2 kT (2.000 metric tons) of Opium annually.
The chemical structure of opiates is very similar to that of naturally produced compounds called endorphins and enkephalins. These compounds are derived from an amino acid pituitary hormone called beta-lipotropin which when released is cleaved to form met-enkephalin, gamma-endorphin, and beta-endorphin. Opiate molecules, due to their similar structure, engage many of the endorphins' nerve-receptor sites in the brain's pleasure centers and bring about similar analgesic effects. In the human body, a pain stimulus usually exites an immediate protective reaction followed by the release of endorphins to relieve discomfort and reward the mental learning process. Opiates mimic high levels of endorphins to produce intense euphoria and a heightened state of well-being. Regular use results in increased tolerance and the need for greater quantities of the drug. Profound physical and psychological dependence results from regular use and rapid cessation brings about withdrawal sickness.

In addition to the pleasure/pain centers, there is also a concentration of opiate receptors in the respiratory center of the brain. Opiates have an inhibiting effect on these cells and in the case of an overdose, respiration can come to a complete halt. Opiates also inhibit sensitivity to the impulse to cough.

A third location for these receptors is in the brain's vomiting center. Opiate use causes nausea and vomiting. Tolerance for this effect is built up very quickly. Opiates effect the digestive system by inhibiting intestinal peristalsis. Long before they were used as painkillers, opiates were used to control diarrhea.

The opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, is an annual plant. From a very small round seed, it grows, flowers, and bears fruit (seed pods) only once. The entire growth cycle for most varieties of this plant takes about 120 days. The seeds of P. somniferum can be distinguished from other species by the appearance of a fine secondary fishnet reticulation within the spaces of the coarse reticulation found all over their surface. When compared with other Papaver species, P. somniferum plants will have their leaves arranged along the stem of the plant, rather than basal leaves, and the leaves and stem will be 'glabrous' (hairless). The tiny seeds germinate quickly, given warmth and sufficient moisture. Sprouts appear in fourteen to twenty-one days. In less than six weeks the young plant has grown four large leaves and resembles a small cabbage in appearance. The lobed, dentate leaves are glaucous green with a dull gray or blue tint.

Within sixty days, the plant will grow from one to two feet in height, with one primary, long, smooth stem. The upper portion of this stem is without leaves and is the 'peduncle'. One or more secondary stems, called 'tillers', may grow from the main stem of the plant. Single poppy plants in Southeast Asia often have one or more tillers.

As the plant grows tall, the main stem and each tiller terminates in a flower bud. During the development of the bud, the peduncle portion of the stem elongates and forms a distinctive 'hook' which causes the bud to be turned upside down. As the flower develops, the peduncle straightens and the buds point upward. A day or two after the buds first point upward, the two outer segments of the bud, called 'sepals,' fall away, exposing the flower petals.

Opium poppies generally flower after about ninety days of growth and continue to flower for two to three weeks. The exposed flower blossom is at first crushed and crinkled, but the petals soon expand and become smooth in the sun. Opium poppy flowers have four petals. The petals may be single or double and may be white, pink, reddish purple, crimson red, or variegated. The petals last for two to four days and then drop to reveal a small, round, green fruit which continues to develop. These fruits or pods (also called 'seedpods', 'capsules,' 'bulbs,' or 'poppy heads') are either oblate, elongated, or globular and mature to about the size of a chicken egg. The oblate-shaped pods are more common in Southeast Asia.

The main stem of a fully-matured P. somniferum plant can range between two to five feet in height. The green leaves are oblong, toothed and lobed and are between four to fifteen inches in diameter at maturity. The mature leaves have no commercial value except for use as animal fodder.

Only the pod portion of the plant can produce opium alkaloids. The skin of the poppy pod encloses the wall of the pod ovary. The ovary wall consists of an outer, middle, and inner layer. The plant's latex (opium) is produced within the ovary wall and drains into the middle layer through a system of vessels and tubes within the pod. The cells of the middle layer secrete more than 95 percent of the opium when the pod is scored and harvested.

Cultivators in Mainland Southeast Asia tap the opium from each pod while it remains on the plant. After the opium is scraped, the pods are cut from the stem and allowed to dry. Once dry, the pods are cut open and the seeds are removed and dried in the sun before storing for the following year's planting. An alternative method of collecting planting seeds is to collect them from intentionally unscored pods, because scoring may diminish the quality of the seeds. Aside from being used as planting seed, the poppy seeds may also be used in cooking and in the manufacture of paints and perfumes. Poppy seed oil is straw-yellow in color, odorless, and has a pleasant, almond-like taste. The opium poppy grows best in temperate, warm climates with low humidity. It requires only a moderate amount of water before and during the early stages of growth. In addition, it is a 'long day' photo-responsive plant. As such, it requires long days and short nights before it will develop flowers.

The opium poppy plant can be grown in a variety of soils; clay, sandy loam, sandy, and sandy clay, but it responds best to sandy loam soil. This type of soil has good moisture-retentive and nutrient-retentive properties, is easily cultivated, and has a favorable structure for root development. Clay soil types are hard and difficult to pulverize into a good soil texture. The roots of a young poppy plant cannot readily penetrate clay soils, and growth is inhibited. Sandy soil, by contrast, does not retain sufficient water or nutrients for proper growth of the plant.

Excessive moisture or extremely arid conditions will adversely affect the poppy plant's growth and reduce the alkaloid content. Poppy plants can become waterlogged and die after a heavy rainfall in poorly drained soil. Heavy rainfall in the second and third months of growth can leach alkaloids from the plant and spoil the opium harvest. Dull, rainy, or cloudy weather during this critical growth period may reduce both the quantity and the quality of the alkaloid content.

Opium poppies were widely grown as an ornamental plant and for seeds in the United States until the possession of this plant was declared illegal in the Opium Poppy Control Act of 1942. New generations of plants from the self-sown seed of these original poppies can still be seen in many old ornamental gardens.

The major legal opium poppy growing areas in the world today are in govemment-regulated opium farms in lndia, Turkey and Tasmania, Australia. The major illegal growing areas are in the highlands of Mainland Southeast Asia, specifically Burma (Myanmar), Laos, and Thailand, as well as the adjacent areas of southern China and northwestern Vietnam. The area is known as the 'Golden Triangle'. In Southwest Asia, opium poppies are grown in Pakistan, Iran, and Afghanistan. Opium poppy is also grown in Lebanon, Guatemala, Colombia and Mexico.

The highlands of Mainland Southeast Asia, at elevations of 800 meters or more above sea level, are prime poppy growing areas. Generally speaking, these poppy-farming areas do not require irrigation, fertilizer, or insecticides for successful opium yields.

Most of the opium poppies of Southeast Asia are grown in Burma (Myamnar), specifically in the Wa and Kokang areas which are in the northeastern quadrant of the Shan State of Burma. Laos is the second-largest illicit opium-producing country in Southeast Asia and third-largest in the world.

In Laos, poppy is cultivated extensively in Houaphan and Xiangkhoang Provinces, as well as the six other northern provinces: Bokeo, Louangnamtha, Louangphabang, Oudomxai, Phongsali and Xaignabouli. Poppy is also grown in many of the remote, mountainous areas of northern Thailand, particularly in Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Mae Hong Son, Nan and Tak Provinces.

In China, opium poppies are cultivated by ethnic minority groups in the mountainous frontier regions of Yunnan Province, particularly along the border area with Burma's Kachin and Shan States. Son La Province, situated between China and Laos, is a major opium poppy cultivation area in Vietnam, as are Lai Chau and Nghe An Provinces.
It is noteworthy that the dominant ethnic groups of Mainland Southeast Asia are not poppy cultivators. The Burmans and Shan of Burma, the Lao of Laos, the Thai of Thailand, the Han Chinese of Yunnan, China, and the Vietnamese of Vietnam are lowlanders and do not traditionally cultivate opium poppies. Rather, it is the ethnic minority highlander groups, such as the Wa, Pa-0, Palaung, Lahu, Lisu, Hmong, and Akha who grow poppies in the highlands of the countries of Southeast Asia.
A typical nuclear family of Mainland Southeast Asian highlanders ranges between five and ten persons, including two to five adults. An average household of poppy farmers can cultivate and harvest about one acre of opium poppy per year. Most of the better fields can support opium poppy cultivation for ten years or more without fertilization, irrigation, or insecticides, before the soil is depleted and new fields must be cleared. In choosing a field to grow opium poppy, soil quality and acidity are critical factors and experienced poppy farmers choose their fields carefully. In Southeast Asia, westerly orientations are typically preferred to optimize sun exposure. Most fields are on mountain slopes at elevations of 1,000 meters (3,000 feet) or more above sea level. Slope gradients of 20 degrees to 40 degrees are considered best for drainage of rain water.

In Mainland Southeast Asia, virgin land is prepared by cutting and piling all brush, vines and small trees in the field during March, at the end of the dry season. After allowing the brush to dry in the hot sun for several days, the field is set afire. This method, called 'slash-and burn' or 'swidden' agriculture, is commonly practiced by dry field farmers - both highland and lowland - throughout Mainland Southeast Asia in order to ready the land for a variety of field crops. The slash-and-burn method is also used to clear fields for poppy cultivation. Before the rainy season in April, fields by the hundreds of thousands all over the region are set ablaze. A fog-like yellow haze hangs over the area for weeks, reducing visibility for hundreds of miles. In the mountains, the dense haze blocks out the sun and stings the eyes.

A typical highlander family will plant an area of two or three rai in opium poppy (2.53 rai is equivalent to one acre). In August or September, toward the end of the rainy season, highland farmers in Southeast Asia prepare fields selected for opium poppy planting. By this time, the ash resulting from the burn-off of the previous dry season has settled into the soil, providing additional nutrients, especially potash. The soil is turned with long-handled hoes after it is softened by the rains. The farmers then break up the large clumps of soil. Weeds and stones are tossed aside and the ground is leveled off.

Traditionally, most highland and upland farmers in Southeast Asia do not use fertilizer for any of their crops, including the opium poppy, but in recent years opium poppy farmers have started using both natural and chemical fertilizers to increase opium poppy yields. Chicken manure, human feces or the regions' abundant bat droppings are often mixed into the planting soil before the opium poppy seed is planted.

The planting must be completed by the end of October in order to take advantage of the region's 'long days' in November and December.
The opium poppy seed can be sown several ways: broadcast (tossed by hand); or fix-dropped by hand into shallow holes dug with a metal-tipped dibble stick. About one pound of opium poppy seed is needed to sow one acre of land. The seeds may be white, yellow, coffee-color, gray, black, or blue. Seed color is not related to the color of the flower petals. Beans, cabbages, cotton, parsley, spinach, squash and tobacco are crops typically planted with the opium poppy. These crops neither help nor hinder the cultivation of the opium poppy, but are planted for personal consumption or as a cash crop.

In the highlands of Southeast Asia, it is a common practice to plant maize and opium poppies in the same fields each year. The maize keeps down excessive weeds and provides feed for the farmer's pigs and ponies. It is grown from April to August. After harvesting the maize, and with the stalks still standing in the fields, the ground is weeded and pulverized. Just before the end of the rainy season, in successive sowings throughout September and October, the poppy seed is broadcast among the maize stalks. These stalks can protect young opium poppy plants from heavy rains.

The opium poppy plants form leaves in the first growth stage, called the 'cabbage' or 'lettuce' stage. After a month of growth, when the opium poppy is about a foot high, some of the plants are removed (called 'thinning') to allow the other plants more room to grow. The ideal spacing between plants is believed to be 20 to 40 centimeters, or about eight to twelve plants per square meter, although some researchers in northern Thailand have reported as many as 18 plants per square meter.

During the first two months, the opium poppies may be damaged or stunted by nature through the lack of adequate sunshine, excessive rainfall, insects, worms, hail storms, early frost, or trampling by animals. The third month of growth does not require as much care as the first two months. Three to four months after planting, from late December to early February, the opium poppies are in full bloom.

Mature plants range between three to five feet in height. Most opium poppy varieties in Southeast Asia produce three to five mature pods per plant. A typical opium poppy field has 60,000 to 120,000 poppy plants per hectare, with a range of 120,000 to 275,000 opium-producing pods. The actual opium yield will depend largely on weather conditions and the precautions taken by individual farmers to safeguard the crop. The farmer and his family generally move into the field for the final two weeks, setting up a small field hut on the edge of the opium poppy field.

The scoring of the pods (also called 'lancing,' 'incising,' or 'tapping') begins about two weeks after the flower petals fall from the pods. The farmer examines the pod and the tiny crown portion on the top of the pod very carefully before scoring.

The grayish-green pod will become a dark green color as it matures and it will swell in size. If the points of the pod's crown are standing straight out or are curved upward, the pod is ready to be scored. If the crown's points turn downward, the pod is not yet fully matured. Not all the plants in a field will be ready for scoring at the same time and each pod can be tapped more than once.

A set of three or four small blades of iron, glass, or glass splinters bound tightly together on a wooden handle is used to score two or three sides of the pod in a vertical direction. If the blades cut too deep into the wall of the pod, the opium will flow too quickly and will drip to the ground. If the incisions are too shallow, the flow will be too slow and the opium will harden in the pods. A depth of about one millimeter is desired for the incision.

Using a blade-tool designed to cut to that depth, scoring ideally starts in late afternoon so the white raw opium latex can ooze out and slowly coagulate on the surface of the pod overnight. If the scoring begins too early in the afternoon, the sun will cause the opium to coagulate over the incision and block the flow. Raw opium oxidizes, darkens and thickens in the cool night air. Early the next morning, the opium gum is scraped from the surface of the pods with a short-handled, flat, iron blade three to four inches wide.

Opium harvesters work their way backwards across the field scoring the lower, mature pods before the taller pods, in order to avoid brushing up against the sticky pods. The pods continue to produce opium for several days. Farmers will return to these plants - sometimes up to five or six times - to gather additional opium until the pod is totally depleted. The opium is collected in a container which hangs from the farmer's neck or waist.

The opium yield from a single pod varies greatly, ranging from 10 to 100 milligrams of opium per pod. The average yield per pod is about 80 milligrams. The dried opium weight yield per hectare of poppies ranges from eight to fifteen kilograms.

As the farmers gather the opium, they will commonly tag the larger or more productive pods with colored string or yarn. These pods will later be cut from their stems, cut open, dried in the sun and their seeds used for the following year's planting.

The wet opium gum collected from the pods contains a relatively high percentage of water and needs to be dried for several days. High-quality raw opium will be brown (rather than black) in color and will retain its sticky texture. Experienced opium traders can quickly determine if the opium has been adulterated with tree sap, sand, or other such materials. Raw opium in Burma, Laos and Thailand is usually sun-dried, weighed in a standard 1.6 kilogram quantity (called a 'viss' in Burma; a 'choi' in Laos and Thailand), wrapped in banana leaf or plastic and then stored until ready to sell, trade, or smoke. While opium smoking is common among most adult opium poppy farmers, heavy addiction is generally limited to the older, male farmers. The average yearly consumption of cooked opium per smoker is estimated to be 1.6 kilograms.

A typical opium poppy farmer household in Southeast Asia will collect 2 to 5 choi or viss (3 to 9 kilograms) of opium from a year's harvest of a one-acre field. That opium will be dried, wrapped and stacked on a shelf by February or March. If the opium has been properly dried, it can be stored indefinitely. Excessive moisture and heat can cause the opium to deteriorate but, once dried, opium is relatively stable. In fact, as opium dries and becomes less pliable, its value increases due to the decrease in water weight per kilogram.

Before opium is smoked, it is usually 'cooked'. Uncooked opium contains moisture, as well as soil, leaves, twigs, and other impurities which diminish the quality of the final product.

The raw opium collected from the opium poppy pods is placed in an open cooking pot of boiling water where the sticky globs of opium alkaloids quickly dissolve. Soil, twigs, plant scrapings, etc., remain undissolved. The solution is then strained through cheesecloth to remove these impurities. The clear brown liquid that remains is opium in solution, sometimes called 'liquid opium'. This liquid is then re-heated over a low flame until the water is driven off into the air as steam leaving a thick dark brown paste. This paste is called 'prepared', 'cooked', or 'smoking' opium. It is dried in the sun until it has a putty-like consistency. The net weight of the cooked opium is generally only eighty percent that of the original raw opium. Thus, cooked opium is more pure than its original, raw form, and has a higher monetary value.

Cooked opium is suitable for smoking or eating by opium users. Traditionally there is only one group of opium poppy farmers, the Hmong, who prefer not to cook their opium before smoking. Most other ethnic groups, including Chinese opium addicts, prefer smoking cooked opium. Raw or cooked opium contains more than thirty-five different alkaloids, including morphine, which accounts for approximately ten percent of the total raw opium weight.





--------------------
Do Your Part!


--------------------


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblebmiles
artist
Female
Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 822
Loc: illinois
Re: poppies [Re: geokills]
    #31296 - 05/16/08 01:30 AM (8 years, 6 months ago)

Thank you sir.
Didn't know you could do that.
:awesome:


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblewowitch420
whippits n ribs
 User Gallery


Registered: 04/22/08
Posts: 5,982
Loc: 512 TX
Re: poppies [Re: bmiles]
    #31703 - 05/16/08 02:29 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)



I got the seeds for this strain off a very well known book selling website... Very cheap and good genetics


--------------------

        heady nugz


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblebmiles
artist
Female
Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 822
Loc: illinois
Re: poppies [Re: wowitch420]
    #31787 - 05/16/08 04:09 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

Did you grow them outside?


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblewowitch420
whippits n ribs
 User Gallery


Registered: 04/22/08
Posts: 5,982
Loc: 512 TX
Re: poppies [Re: bmiles]
    #31903 - 05/16/08 07:56 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

yep


--------------------

        heady nugz


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblebmiles
artist
Female
Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 822
Loc: illinois
Re: poppies [Re: wowitch420]
    #32038 - 05/17/08 12:27 AM (8 years, 6 months ago)

Good yield?


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineDankenstein
Registered: 04/21/08
Posts: 46
Last seen: 4 years, 6 months
Re: poppies [Re: SoLiTuDE]
    #32980 - 05/18/08 04:50 AM (8 years, 6 months ago)

http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Cat/0/Number/7989783/an/0/page/0

There's one grow log to give you an idea. Poppies flower when the day gets longer, not when it gets shorter like marijuana so you can treat it in a similar manner and keep it vegging with 12/12 and flower with 18/6 if you want bigger plants. That's indoors though and I don't recommend growing them inside. Their roots can get massive and if you're trying to grow big it can take more than a 5 gallon pot which gets expensive to fill with potting soil, especially with more than one plant.

You could transplant them outside after you've vegged them indoors. They're not too good with transplanting but it can be done. Depending where you live, you can also start poppies during the spring or fall. If you start it in the fall and your area doesn't get too cold, the poppies will stay vegged in a semi-dormant state and then resume growth in the spring. I've got my first poppy of the season from last fall flowering right now. Good luck.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblebmiles
artist
Female
Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 822
Loc: illinois
Re: poppies [Re: Dankenstein]
    #32981 - 05/18/08 04:57 AM (8 years, 6 months ago)

Is one poppy pod generally enough to make a strong tea,
or do you need more pods?


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlinearaucaria
Male

Registered: 04/21/08
Posts: 161
Loc: Oregon
Last seen: 7 years, 23 days
Re: poppies [Re: bmiles]
    #35239 - 05/20/08 11:12 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

if the pods are big, 2 is enough


--------------------
Kids are always honest
Cause they don't think their ever gonna die


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleLaysthepipe
Vivi Sex Symbol
 User Gallery

Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 1,359
Loc: KOREA
Re: poppies [Re: araucaria]
    #35855 - 05/21/08 04:34 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

When you make the pod tea do you take out the seeds before making it or just leave them in there?


--------------------
:advisory:

“If you want to find out who your real friends are, sink the ship. The first ones to jump aren’t your friends.” — Marilyn Manson

This isn't the correct place to confront me on anything.

Forum full of dead stars, and a necro I called Coma White


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflinegrimR
 User Gallery

Registered: 04/30/08
Posts: 58
Last seen: 3 years, 10 months
Re: poppies [Re: Laysthepipe]
    #36597 - 05/22/08 02:49 AM (8 years, 6 months ago)

oils on the seeds can cause stomach discomfort so you could take them out


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
InvisibleLaysthepipe
Vivi Sex Symbol
 User Gallery

Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 1,359
Loc: KOREA
Re: poppies [Re: grimR]
    #36884 - 05/22/08 07:18 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

Since we are on subject theres no sense in creating a new thread, im thinking about spreading poppy seeds in a bunch of locations, if i just let them grow and they flower, and I dont mess with them, will they become an annual weed when the seed pods die and spread seeds?


--------------------
:advisory:

“If you want to find out who your real friends are, sink the ship. The first ones to jump aren’t your friends.” — Marilyn Manson

This isn't the correct place to confront me on anything.

Forum full of dead stars, and a necro I called Coma White


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offline0xYg3n
el cid
 User Gallery

Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 2,591
Last seen: 7 years, 9 months
Re: poppies [Re: SoLiTuDE]
    #37956 - 05/23/08 03:54 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

Hey


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineaDoS
freedom lover
Male


Registered: 05/04/08
Posts: 979
Loc: land of the free
Last seen: 7 years, 8 months
Re: poppies [Re: bmiles]
    #40223 - 05/26/08 09:34 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

well, if you grow poppies, I wouldn't dry the pods to make tea with. You would get more doses out of it if you scored the pods, refined the opium, and make tea from the refined opium tar...or even better, smoke it.

Dried pods is just good for using a loop hole on ebay. They get you opiated, but it uses way too much, compared to just scoring the fresh pod.


--------------------
"If we could sniff or swallow something that would, for five or six hours each day, abolish our solitude as individuals, atone us with our fellows in a glowing exaltation of affection and make life in all its aspects seem not only worth living, but divinely beautiful and significant, and if this heavenly, world-transfiguring drug were of such a kind that we could wake up next morning with a clear head and an undamaged constitution - then, it seems to me, all our problems (and not merely the one small problem of discovering a novel pleasure) would be wholly solved and earth would become paradise." - Aldous Huxley
GIVE ME OPIATES OR GIVE ME DEATH


Edited by aDoS (05/26/08 09:38 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblebmiles
artist
Female
Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 822
Loc: illinois
Re: poppies [Re: aDoS]
    #40226 - 05/26/08 09:37 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

I don't know if I have the patience/money to start growing fresh pods though.

:sad:


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
OfflineaDoS
freedom lover
Male


Registered: 05/04/08
Posts: 979
Loc: land of the free
Last seen: 7 years, 8 months
Re: poppies [Re: bmiles]
    #40239 - 05/26/08 09:43 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

well, if you just want to get opiated once in a while...dried pods from ebay isn't bad. But if you developed an addiction, and were physically dependent on them, and your only source was from ebay...that would not be good, because one day they are going to crack down on poppies being sold on ebay. I feel so sorry for some people I know when that day does happen. One day they are not going to be able to order their fix for the month :frown:.

And its not really a...it might happen or it might not. Sooner or later ebay is going to ban selling poppies. Because they are going to gain popularity, and some kid is going to overdose on pod tea and die, and his parents will blame ebay for it...and that will be the end.

I dunno...if you are ever planning on being addicted, be patient, buy some seeds(they're cheap and legal), and grow your own poppies.


--------------------
"If we could sniff or swallow something that would, for five or six hours each day, abolish our solitude as individuals, atone us with our fellows in a glowing exaltation of affection and make life in all its aspects seem not only worth living, but divinely beautiful and significant, and if this heavenly, world-transfiguring drug were of such a kind that we could wake up next morning with a clear head and an undamaged constitution - then, it seems to me, all our problems (and not merely the one small problem of discovering a novel pleasure) would be wholly solved and earth would become paradise." - Aldous Huxley
GIVE ME OPIATES OR GIVE ME DEATH


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Invisiblebmiles
artist
Female
Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 822
Loc: illinois
Re: poppies [Re: aDoS]
    #40244 - 05/26/08 09:46 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

Growing would probably be the best for me to do,
I miss opiates like crazy and it would be tons cheaper
than buying pillz.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Offlinehighasfuck
The last samuri
Male User Gallery

Registered: 04/20/08
Posts: 6,886
Loc: So Cal
Last seen: 7 years, 10 months
Re: poppies [Re: bmiles]
    #40255 - 05/26/08 09:49 PM (8 years, 6 months ago)

I wanna smoke some opium so bad. I want to buy a gram. Someone mail me some.


Post Extras: Print Post  Remind Me! Notify Moderator
Jump to top. Pages: 1 | 2 | Next >  [ show all ]

Amazon Shop for: Papaver Somniferum, Toilet Paper

Community >> Other Growables

Similar ThreadsPosterViewsRepliesLast post
* Finally Opium Poppys!
( 1 2 all )
Fungi_x 6,325 25 08/22/08 04:13 PM
by Voodoo
* Opium Poppy Pictorial
( 1 2 3 all )
Yrat 25,319 41 05/15/13 07:51 PM
by budgrowerwannabe
* anyone grow poppies indoors?
captain.koons
2,575 4 07/16/08 07:18 PM
by captain.koons
* Poppies
( 1 2 3 all )
Calibrate 7,315 40 02/11/09 09:13 PM
by Potty Mouth
* opium poppy question Voodoo 1,657 5 02/16/09 04:40 PM
by Burbles
* best method for harvesting opium from poppies other than lancing Harry_Ba11sachM 19,755 14 07/18/08 03:49 AM
by jeetered
* Growing Poppys tis Year? Linux 1,866 7 04/10/09 11:31 AM
by ethnoguy
* Poppy Question freepain 914 2 09/29/08 02:06 PM
by Voodoo

Extra information
You cannot start new topics / You cannot reply to topics
HTML is disabled / BBCode is enabled
Moderator: Simisu
7,045 topic views. 0 members, 9 guests and 5 web crawlers are browsing this forum.
[ Toggle Favorite | Print Topic | Stats ]
Search this thread:
Royal Queen Seeds Cannabis Seeds
Please support our sponsors.

Copyright 1997-2016 Mind Media. Some rights reserved.

Generated in 0.042 seconds spending 0.004 seconds on 16 queries.