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Offlinelilmafia513
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Registered: 05/31/09
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Last seen: 22 days, 9 hours
marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! * 1
    #234999 - 06/01/09 03:15 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Here is what i keep in plastic in my grow room. It is a diagnostic checklist to read through and find the symptoms of your sick plant, also how to fix it, and what it is caused by.

I printed this off a few moons ago, and never let it leave the room. I'm on my third copy now!!! Well, here it goes.......:stoned:

Before we get into this I want you to check a couple things, check the following things:
Plants have plenty of water
Soil is seven PH or even a little less
Your light cycles are correct
No pools of water
Constant fresh air
Now thats out of the way let's diagnose your plant.

To use the Problem-Solver, simply start at #1 below. When you think you've found the problem, read the Nutrients section to learn more about it. Diagnose carefully before making major changes.

1) If the problem affects only the bottom or middle of the plant go to #2. b) If it affects only the top of the plant or the growing tips, skip to #10. If the problem seems to affect the entire plant equally, skip to #6.

2) Leaves are a uniform yellow or light green; leaves die & drop; growth is slow. Leaf margins are not curled-up noticeably. >> Nitrogen(N) deficiency. b) If not, go to #3.

3) Margins of the leaves are turned up, and the tips may be twisted. Leaves are yellowing (and may turn brown), but the veins remain somewhat green. >> Magnesium (Mg) deficiency. b) If not, go to #4.

4) Leaves are browning or yellowing. Yellow, brown, or necrotic (dead) patches, especially around the edges of the leaf, which may be curled. Plant may be too tall. >> Potassium (K) deficiency. b) If not, keep reading.

5) Leaves are dark green or red/purple. Stems and petioles may have purple & red on them. Leaves may turn yellow or curl under. Leaf may drop easily. Growth may be slow and leaves may be small. >> Phosphorus(P) deficiency. b) If not, go to #6.

6) Tips of leaves are yellow, brown, or dead. Plant otherwise looks healthy & green. Stems may be soft >> Over-fertilization (especially N), over-watering, damaged roots, or insufficient soil aeration (use more sand or perlite. Occasionally due to not enough N, P, or K. b) If not, go to #7.

7) Leaves are curled under like a ram's horn, and are dark green, gray, brown, or gold. >> Over-fertilization (too much N). b) If not, go to #8…

8) The plant is wilted, even though the soil is moist. >> Over-fertilization, soggy soil, damaged roots, disease; copper deficiency (very unlikely). b) If not, go to #9.

9) Plants won't flower, even though they get 12 hours of darkness for over 2 weeks. >> The night period is not completely dark. Too much nitrogen. Too much pruning or cloning. b) If not, go to #10...

10) Leaves are yellow or white, but the veins are mostly green. >> Iron (Fe) deficiency. b) If not, go to #11.

11) Leaves are light green or yellow beginning at the base, while the leaf margins remain green. Necrotic spots may be between veins. Leaves are not twisted. >> Manganese (Mn) deficiency. b) If not, #12.

12) Leaves are twisted. Otherwise, pretty much like #11. >> Zinc (Zn) deficiency. b) If not, #13.

13) Leaves twist, then turn brown or die. >> The lights are too close to the plant. Rarely, a Calcium (Ca) or Boron (B) deficiency. b) If not… You may just have a weak plant.


The Nutrients:

Nitrogen - Plants need lots of N during vegging, but it's easy to overdo it. Added too much? Flush the soil with plain water. Soluble nitrogen (especially nitrate) is the form that's the most quickly available to the roots, while insoluble N (like urea) first needs to be broken down by microbes in the soil before the roots can absorb it. Avoid excessive ammonium nitrogen, which can interfere with other nutrients. Too much N delays flowering. Plants should be allowed to become N-deficient late in flowering for best flavor.

Magnesium - Mg-deficiency is pretty common since marijuana uses lots of it and many fertilizers don't have enough of it. Mg-deficiency is easily fixed with ¼ teaspoon/gallon of Epsom salts (first powdered and dissolved in some hot water) or foilar feed at ½ teaspoon/quart. When mixing up soil, use 2 teaspoon dolomite lime per gallon of soil for Mg. Mg can get locked-up by too much Ca, Cl or ammonium nitrogen. Don't overdo Mg or you'll lock up other nutrients.

Potassium - Too much sodium (Na) displaces K, causing a K deficiency. Sources of high salinity are: baking soda (sodium bicarbonate "pH-up"), too much manure, and the use of water-softening filters (which should not be used). If the problem is Na, flush the soil. K can get locked up from too much Ca or ammonium nitrogen, and possibly cold weather.

Phosphorous - Some deficiency during flowering is normal, but too much shouldn't be tolerated. Red petioles and stems are a normal, genetic characteristic for many varieties, plus it can also be a co-symptom of N, K, and Mg-deficiencies, so red stems are not a foolproof sign of P-deficiency. Too much P can lead to iron deficiency.

Iron - Fe is unavailable to plants when the pH of the water or soil is too high. If deficient, lower the pH to about 6.5 (for rockwool, about 5.7), and check that you're not adding too much P, which can lock up Fe. Use iron that's chelated for maximum availability. Read your fertilizer's ingredients - chelated iron might read something like "iron EDTA". To much Fe without adding enough P can cause a P-deficiency.

Manganese - Mn gets locked out when the pH is too high, and when there's too much iron. Use chelated Mn.

Zinc - Also gets locked out due to high pH. Zn, Fe, and Mn deficiencies often occur together, and are usually from a high pH. Don't overdo the micro-nutrients-lower the pH if that's the problem so the nutrients become available. Foilar feed if the plant looks real bad. Use chelated zinc.

Check Your Water - Crusty faucets and shower heads mean your water is "hard," usually due to too many minerals. Tap water with a TDS (total dissolved solids) level of more than around 200ppm (parts per million) is "hard" and should be looked into, especially if your plants have a chronic problem. Ask your water company for an analysis listing, which will usually list the pH, TDS, and mineral levels (as well as the pollutants, carcinogens, etc) for the tap water in your area. This is a common request, especially in this day and age, so it shouldn't raise an eyebrow. Regular water filters will not reduce a high TDS level, but the costlier reverse-osmosis units, distillers, and de-ionizers will. A digital TDS meter (or EC = electrical conductivity meter) is an incredibly useful tool for monitoring the nutrient levels of nutrient solution, and will pay for itself before you know it. They run about $40 and up.

General Feeding Tips - Pot plants are very adaptable, but a general rule of thumb is to use more nitrogen & less phosphorous during the vegetative period, and the exact opposite during the flowering period. For the veg. period try a N:P:K ratio of about 10:7:8 (which of course is the same ratio as 20:14:16), and for flowering plants, 4:8:8. Check the pH after adding nutrients. If you use a reservoir, keep it circulating and change it every 2 weeks. A general guideline for TDS levels is as follows:
seedlings = 50-150 ppm; unrooted clones = 100-350 ppm; small plants = 400-800 ppm; large plants = 900-1800 ppm; last week of flowering = taper off to plain water. These numbers are just a guideline, and many factors can change the actual level the plants will need. Certain nutrients are "invisible" to TDS meters, especially organics, so use TDS level only as an estimate of actual nutrient levels. When in doubt about a new fertilizer, follow the fertilizer's directions for feeding tomatoes. Grow a few tomato or radish plants nearby for comparison.

PH - The pH of water after adding any nutrients should be around 5.9-6.5 (in rockwool, 5.5-6.1). Generally speaking, the micro-nutrients (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu) get locked out at a high pH (alkaline) above 7.0, while the major nutrients (N, P, K, Mg) can be less available in acidic soil or water (below 5.0). Tap water is often too alkaline. Soils with lots of peat or other organic matter in them tend to get too acidic, which some dolomite lime will help fix. Soil test kits vary in accuracy, and generally the more you pay the better the accuracy. For the water, color-based pH test kits from aquarium stores are inexpensive, but inaccurate. Invest in a digital pH meter ($40-80), preferably a waterproof one. You won't regret it.

Cold - Cold weather (below 50F/10C) can lock up phosphorous. Some
varieties, like equatorial sativas, don't take well to cold weather. If you can keep the roots warmer, the plant will be able to take cooler temps than it otherwise could.

Heat - If the lights are too close to the plant, the tops may be curled, dry, and look burnt, mimicking a nutrient problem. Your hand should not feel hot after a minute when you hold it at the top of the plants. Raise the lights and/or aim a fan at the hot zone. Room temps should be kept under 85F (29C) -- or 90F (33) if you add additional CO2.

Humidity - Thin, shriveled leaves can be from low humidity. 40-80 % is usually fine.

Mold and Fungus - Dark patchy areas on leaves and buds can be mold. Lower the humidity and increase the ventilation if mold is a problem. Remove any dead leaves, wherever they are. Keep your garden clean.

Insects - White spots on the tops of leaves can mean spider mites
underneath.

Sprays - Foilar sprays can have a "magnifying glass" effect under bright lights, causing small white, yellow or burnt spots which can be confused with a nutrient problem. Some sprays can also cause chemical reactions.

Insufficient light - tall, stretching plants are usually from using the wrong kind of light.. Don't use regular incandescent bulbs ("grow bulbs") or halogens to grow cannabis. Invest in fluorescent lighting (good) or HID lighting (much better) which supply the high-intensity light
that cannabis needs for good growth and tight buds. Even better, grow in sunlight.

Clones - yellowing leaves on unrooted clones can be from too much light, or the stem may not be firmly touching the rooting medium. Turn off any CO2 until they root. Too much fertilizer can shrivel or wilt clones - plain tap water is fine.


Edited by lilmafia513 (06/02/09 06:22 PM)


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InvisibleHarry_Ba11sachM
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #235005 - 06/01/09 03:23 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Wow, some quick googling to add a few pictures for the deficiencies and I'd say that's worthy of being hung on my wall as well


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Offlinelilmafia513
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Harry_Ba11sach]
    #235014 - 06/01/09 03:33 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Quote:

Harry_Ba11sach said:
Wow, some quick googling to add a few pictures for the deficiencies and I'd say that's worthy of being hung on my wall as well



Give me some time man, I'm working on pics as we speak...LOL!!!
I'm trying to give as much info as i can to help get this place up and running.

Here is the pics to go with the plant problem solver. I added a few to this such as heat stress, nute burn, and the immobile elements. Some of this info is so old it may be outdated a bit, as more and more growers go hydro and aero, and forget about the soil problems.


PLANT ABUSE
Heat Stress:
Look closely below, and you'll see the brown leaf edges that are indicative of heat stress. This damage looks allot like nutrient burn, except it occurs only at the tops of the plants closest to the lamps. There's only one cure for this...get the heat away from the plants, either by moving the lamps or moving the plants.


Figure 1

Nutrient Solution Burn:
There's a good chance that this leaf was subjected to nutrient solution burn. These symptoms are seen when the EC concentration of hydroponic solutions is too high. These symptoms also appear when strong nutrient solution is splashed onto the leaves under hot HID lamps, causing the leaves to burn under the solution.


Figure 2

Many hydroponic gardeners see this problem. It's the beginning of nutrient burn. It indicates that the plants have all the nutrients they can possibly use, and there's a slight excess. Back off the concentration of the nutrient solution just a touch, and the problem should disappear. Note that if the plants never get any worse than this leaf (figure 3), then the plants are probably just fine. Figure 4 is definitely an over-fert problem. The high level of nutrients accumulates in the leaves and causes them to dry out and burn up as shown here. You must flush with clear, clean water immediately to allow the roots to recover, and prevent further damage. Now find the cause of the high nutrient levels.


Figure 3 (left) and Figure 4 (right)

Over Watering:
The plants in figure 5 were on a continuous drip system, where nutrient solution is constantly being pumped into the medium. This tends to keep the entire root system completely saturated. A better way would be to periodically feed the plants, say for 1/2 hour every 2-3 hours. This would give the roots a chance to get needed air to them, and prevent root rot and other problems.
Don't be throw off by the fact that the plants in figure 5 are sitting in still water, this is actually an H2O2 solution used to try and correct the problem. Adding an air stone to the tub would also help add O2 to the solution.


Figure 5

pH Fluctuation:
Both of these leaves in figure 6 and figure 7 are from the same plant. It could be over fertilization, but more likely it is due to the pH being off. Too high or too low a pH can lock up nutrients in the form of undisolvable salts and compounds, some of which are actually toxic to the plants. What then happens is the grower then tries to supplement the plants diet by adding more fertilizers, throwing off the pH even more and locking up even more nutrients. This type of problem is seen more often in soil mixes, where inconsistent mixing of the mediums components leads to "hot" spots.


Figure 6 (left) and Figure 7 (right)
Ozone Damage:
Ozone damage typically found near the generator. Although a rare problem, symptoms generally appear as a Mg deficiency, but the symptoms are localized to immediately around the generator.


Figure 8
NUTRIENT PROBLEMS
Root Stunting:
Root stunting is characteristic of calcium deficiency, acidity, aluminum toxicity, and copper toxicity. Some species may also show it when boron deficient. The shortened roots become thickened, the laterals become stubby, peg-like, and the whole system often discolors, brown or grey.
Symptoms localized at shoot growing points.
New shoots unopened; young leaves distorted; dead leaf tips; pale green plant copper deficiency
New shoots withered or dead; petiole or stem collapse; shoots stunted; green plant calcium deficiency Young leaves pale green or yellow; rosetting or dead tip; dieback; dark green plant boron deficiency

MOBILE ELEMENTS
Mobile elements are more likely to exhibit visual deficiencies in the older leaves, because during demand these elements will be exported to the new growth.

Nitrogen (N)
Nitrate - Ammonium is found in both inorganic and organic forms in the plant, and combines with carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and sometimes sulfur to form amino acids, amino enzymes, nucleic acids, chlorophyll, alkaloids, and purine bases. Nitrogen rates high as molecular weight proteins in plant tissue.
Plants need lots of N during vegging, but it's easy to overdo it. Added too much? Flush the soil with plain water. Soluble nitrogen (especially nitrate) is the form that's the most quickly available to the roots, while insoluble N (like urea) first needs to be broken down by microbes in the soil before the roots can absorb it. Avoid excessive ammonium nitrogen, which can interfere with other nutrients.
Too much N delays flowering. Plants should be allowed to become N-deficient late in flowering for best flavor.

Nitrogen Deficiencies:
Plants will exhibit lack of vigor, slow growth and will be weak and stunted. Quality and yield will be significantly reduced. Older leaves become yellow (chlorotic) from lack of chlorophyll. Deficient plants will exhibit uniform light green to yellow on older leaves, these leaves may die and drop. Leaf margins will not curled up noticeably. Chlorosis will eventually spread throughout the plant. Stems, petioles and lower leaf surfaces may turn purple.


Figure 9

As seen in figure 10 consumption of nitrogen (N) from the fan leaves during the final phase of flowing is 100% normal.


Figure 10

Nitrogen Toxicity:
Leaves are often dark green and in the early stages abundant with foliage. If excess is severe, leaves will dry and begin to fall off. Root system will remain under developed or deteriorate after time. Fruit and flower set will be inhibited or deformed.
With breakdown of vascular tissue restricting water uptake. Stress resistance is drastically diminished.


Phosphorus (P)
Phosphorus is a component of certain enzymes and proteins, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), ribonucleic acids (RNA), deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) and phytin. ATP is involved in various energy transfer reactions, and RNA and DNA are components of genetic information.

Phosphorus (P) deficiency:
Figure 11 is severe phosphorus (P) deficiency during flowering. Fan leaves are dark green or red/purple, and may turn yellow. Leaves may curl under, go brown and die. Small-formed buds are another main symptom.
Phosphorus deficiencies exhibit slow growing, weak and stunted plants with dark green or purple pigmentation in older leaves and stems.
Some deficiency during flowering is normal, but too much shouldn't be tolerated. Red petioles and stems are a normal, genetic characteristic for many varieties, plus it can also be a co-symptom of N, K, and Mg-deficiencies, so red stems are not a foolproof sign of P-deficiency. Too much P can lead to iron deficiency.
Purpling: accumulation of anthocyanin pigments; causes an overall dark green color with a purple, red, or blue tint, and is the common sign of phosphate deficiency. Some plant species and varieties respond to phosphate deficiency by yellowing instead of purpling. Purpling is natural to some healthy ornamentals.


Figure 11

Figure 12 shows Phosphorus (P) deficiency during vegetative growth. Many people mistaken this for a fungus, but look for the damage to occur near the end of leave, and leaves the color dull grayish with a very brittle texture.


Figure 12


Phosphorus (P) Toxicity:
This condition is rare and usually buffered by pH limitations. Excess phosphorus can interfere with the availability and stability of copper and zinc.

Potassium (K)
Potassium is involved in maintaining the water status of the plant and the
tugor pressure of it's cells and the opening and closing of the stomata. Potassium is required in the accumulation and translocation of carbohydrates. Lack of potassium will reduce yield and quality.
Potassium deficiency:
Older leaves are initially chlorotic but soon develop dark necrotic lesions
(dead tissue). First apparent on the tips and margins of the leaves. Stem and branches may become weak and easily broken, the plant may also stretch. The plant will become susceptible to disease and toxicity. In addition to appearing to look like iron deficiency, the tips of the leaves curl and the edges burn and die.
Potassium - Too much sodium (Na) displaces K, causing a K deficiency. Sources of high salinity are: baking soda (sodium bicarbonate "pH-up"), too much manure, and the use of water-softening filters (which should not be used). If the problem is Na, flush the soil. K can get locked up from too much Ca or ammonium nitrogen, and possibly cold weather.


Figure 13


Figure 14

Potassium (K) Toxicity:
Usually not absorbed excessively by plants. Excess potassium can aggravate the uptake of magnesium, manganese, zinc and iron and effect the availability of calcium.

Magnesium (Mg)
Magnesium is a component of the chlorophyll molecule and serves as a cofactor in most enzymes.
Magnesium (Mg) deficiency:
Magnesium deficiency will exhibit a yellowing (which may turn brown) and interveinal chlorosis beginning in the older leaves. The older leaves will be the first to develop interveinal chlorosis. Starting at leaf margin or tip and progressing inward between the veins. Notice how the veins remain somewhat green though as can be seen in figure 15.
Notice how in figure 17 the leaves curl upwards like they're praying? They're praying for Mg! The tips may also twist.
This can be quickly resolved by watering with 1 tablespoon Epsom salts/gallon of water. Until you can correct nutrient lockout, try foilar feeding. That way the plants get all the nitrogen and Mg they need. The plants can be foilar feed at ½ teaspoon/quart of Epsom salts (first powdered and dissolved in some hot water). When mixing up soil, use 2 teaspoon dolomite lime per gallon of soil.
If the starting water is above 200 ppm, that is pretty hard water, that will lock out mg with all of the calcium in the water. Either add a 1/4 teaspoon per gallon of Epsom salts or lime (both will effectively reduce the lockout or invest into a reverse osmosis water filter.
Mg can get locked-up by too much Ca, Cl or ammonium nitrogen. Don't overdo Mg or you'll lock up other nutrients.


Figure 15




Figure 17

Magnesium (Mg) Toxicity:
Magnesium toxicity is rare and not generally exhibited visibly. Extreme high levels will antagonize other ions in the nutrient solution.
Zinc (Zn)
Zinc plays a roll in the same enzyme functions as manganese and magnesium. More than eighty enzymes contain tightly bound zinc essential for their function. Zinc participates in chlorophyll formation and helps prevent chlorophyll destruction. Carbonic anhydrate has been found to be specifically activated by zinc.

Zinc Deficiencies:
Deficiencies appear as chlorosis in the inter-veinal areas of new leaves producing a banding appearance as seen in figure 18. This may be accompany reduction of leaf size and a shortening between internodes. Leaf margins are often distorted or wrinkled. Branch terminals of fruit will die back in severe cases.
Also gets locked out due to high pH. Zn, Fe, and Mn deficiencies often occur together, and are usually from a high pH. Don't overdo the micro-nutrients, lower the pH if that's the problem so the nutrients become available. Foilar feed if the plant looks real bad. Use chelated zinc. Zinc deficiency produces "little leaf" in many species, especially woody ones; the younger leaves are distinctly smaller than normal. Zinc deficiency may also produce "rosetting"; the stem fails to elongate behind the growing tip, so that the terminal leaves become tightly bunched.


Figure 18

Zinc Toxicity:
Excess Zinc is extremely toxic and will cause rapid death. Excess zinc interferes with iron causing chlorosis from iron deficiency. Excess will cause sensitive plants to become chlorotic.

IMMOBILE ELEMENTS
Immobile elements will show their first symptoms on younger leaves and progress to the whole plant.



________________________________________
Sulphur (S)
Sulfate is involved in protein synthesis and is part of the amino acids, cystine and thiamine, which are the building blocks of proteins. It is active in the structure and metabolism in the plant. It is essential for respiration and the synthesis and breakdown of fatty acids.

Sulphur (S) deficiency:
The initial symptoms are the yellowing of the entire leaf including veins usually starting with the younger leaves. Leaf tips may yellow and curl downward. Sulfur deficiencies are light green fruit or younger leaves with a lack of succulence. Elongated roots and woody stem. Although it's hard to see in figure 19, the upper stems of this plant are purple. Although many varieties of cannabis do get purplish stems, the trait generally extends the entire length of the plant's stem, and not just near the top as in this specimen.


Figure 19

Sulphur Toxicity:
Leaf size will be reduced and overall growth will be stunted. Leaves yellowing or scorched at edges. Excess may cause early senescence.

Calcium (Ca)
Calcium plays an important role in maintaining cell integrity and membrane permeability.

Calcium Deficiency:
Young leaves are affected first and become small and distorted or chlorotic with irregular margins, spotting or necrotic areas. Bud development is inhibited, blossom end rot and internal decay may also occur and root may be under developed or die back. Deficiency will cause leaf tip die-back, leaf tip curl and marginal necrosis and chlorosis primarily in younger leaves. Symptoms: young leaves develop chlorosis and distortion such as crinkling, dwarfing, developing a strap-like shape, shoots stop growing and thicken.

Calcium Toxicity:
Difficult to distinguish visually. May precipitate with sulfur in solution and cause clouding or residue in tank. Excess calcium may produce deficiencies in magnesium and potassium.

Iron (Fe)
Iron is an important component of plant enzyme systems for electron transport to carry electrons during photosynthesis and terminal respiration. It is a catalyst for chlorophyll production and is required for nitrate and sulfate reduction and assimilation.
Iron deficiency:
- Pronounced interveinal chlorosis similar to that caused by magnesium deficiency but on the younger leaves.
-Leaves exhibit chlorosis (yellowing) of the leaves mainly between the veins, starting with the lower and middle leaves.

Caused by factors that interfere with iron absorption of roots: over irrigation, excessive soluble salts, inadequate drainage, pests, high substrate pH, or nematodes. This is easily corrected by adding an iron supplement with the next watering.

Fe is unavailable to plants when the pH of the water or soil is too high. If deficient, lower the pH to about 6.5 (for rockwool, about 5.7), and check that you're not adding too much P, which can lock up Fe. Use iron that's chelated for maximum availability. Read your fertilizer's ingredients - chelated iron might read something like "iron EDTA". To much Fe without adding enough P can cause a P-deficiency.

Note : When adding iron to the solution, it is often necessary to not use fertilizer for that watering. Iron has a tendency of reacting with many of the components of fertilizer solutions, and will cause nutrient lockup to occur. Read the labels of both the iron supplement and the fertilizer you are using before you attempt to combine the two.

Iron Toxicity:
Excess accumulation is rare but could cause bronzing or tiny brown spots on leaf surface.

Manganese (Mn)
Manganese is involved in the oxidation reduction process in the photosynthetic electron transport system. Biochemical research shows that this element plays a structural role in the chloroplast membrane system, and also activates numerous enzymes.
Manganese Deficiency:
Interveinal chlorosis of younger leaves, necrotic lesions and leaf shredding are typical symptom of this deficiency. High levels can cause uneven distribution of chlorophyll resulting in blotchy appearance. Restricted growth and failure to mature normally can also result.
-Mn gets locked out when the pH is too high, and when there's too much iron. Use chelated Mn.
Manganese Toxicity:
Toxicity:Chlorosis, or blotchy leaf tissue due to insufficient chlorophyll synthesis. Growth rate will slow and vigor will decline.

Chlorine (Cl)
Chloride is involved in the evolution of oxygen in the photosynthesis process and is essential for cell division in roots and leaves. Chlorine raises the cell osmotic pressure and affects stomata regulation and increases the hydration of plant tissue. Levels less than 140 ppm are safe for most plants. Chloride sensitive plants may experience tip or marginal leaf burn at concentrations above 20 ppm.
Chlorine Deficiency:
Wilted chlorotic leaves become bronze in color. Roots become stunted and thickened near tips. Plants with chlorine deficiencies will be pale and suffer wilting.
Chlorine Toxicity:
Burning of leaf tip or margins. Bronzing, yellowing and leaf splitting. Reduced leaf size and lower growth rate.

Boron (B)
Boron biochemical functions are yet uncertain, but evidence suggests it is involved in the synthesis of one of the bases for nucleic acid (RNA uracil) formation. It may also be involved in some cellular activities such as division, differentiation, maturation and respiration. It is associated with pollen germination.
Boron Deficiency:
Plants deficient in boron exhibit brittle abnormal growth at shoot tips and one of the earliest symptoms is failure of root tips to elongate normally. Stem and root apical meristems often die. Root tips often become swollen and discolored. Internal tissues may rot and become host to fungal disease. Leaves show various symptoms which include drying, thickening, distorting, wilting, and chlorotic or necrotic spotting.
Boron Toxicity:
Yellowing of leaf tip followed by necrosis of the leaves beginning at tips or margins and progressing inward before leaves die and prematurely fall off. Some plants are especially sensitive to boron accumulation.

Copper (Cu)
Copper is a constituent of many enzymes and proteins. Assists in carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen fixation and in the process of oxygen reduction.
Copper Deficiency:
Symptoms of deficiency are a reduced or stunted growth with a distortion of the younger leaves and growth tip die-back. Young leaves often become dark green and twisted. They may die back or just exhibit necrotic spots. Growth and yield will be deficient as well.
Copper Toxicity:
Copper is required in very small amounts and readily becomes toxic in solution culture if not carefully controlled. Excess values will induce iron deficiency. Root growth will be suppressed followed by symptoms of iron chlorosis, stunting, reduced branching, abnormal darkening and thickening of roots.

Molybdenum (Mo)
Molybdenum is a component of two major enzyme systems involved in the nitrate reeducates, this is the process of conversion of nitrate to ammonium.
Molybdenum Deficiencies:
Often interveinal chlorosis which occurs first on older leaves, then progressing to the entire plant. Developing severely twisted younger leaves which eventually die. Molybdenum deficiencies frequently resemble nitrogen, with older leaves chlorotic with rolled margins and stunted growth.
Molybdenum Toxicity:
Excess may cause discoloration of leaves depending on plant species. This condition is rare but could occur from accumulation by continuous application. Used by the plant in very small quantities. Excess mostly usually does not effect the plant, however the consumption of high levels by grazing animals can pose problems so she might not be too good to smoke.

Sodium (Na)
Sodium seems to encourage crop yields and in specific cases it acts as an antidoting agent against various toxic salts. It may act as a partial substitute for potassium deficiencies. Excess may cause plant toxicity or induce deficiencies of other elements. If sodium predominates in the solution calcium and magnesium may be affected.

Silicon (Si)
Silicon usually exists in solution as silicic acid and is absorbed in this form. It accumulates as hydrated amorphous silica most abundantly in walls of epidermal cells, but also in primary and secondary walls of other cells. It is largely available in soils and is found in water as well. Inadequate amounts of silicon can reduce tomato yields as much as 50%, cause new leaves to be deformed and inhibit fruit set. At this time toxicity symptoms are undetermined.

Cobalt (Co)
Cobalt is essential to many beneficial bacteria that are involved in nitrogen fixation of legumes. It is a component of vitamin B12 which is essential to most animals and possibly in plants. Reports suggest that it may be involved with enzymes needed to form aromatic compounds. Otherwise, it is not understood fully as to its benefit to plant growth, but it is considered essential to some animal health issues.


Edited by lilmafia513 (06/02/09 07:26 PM)


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Offlinelilmafia513
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #235017 - 06/01/09 03:34 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

working on the start from scratch grow guide right now......it's a new thread i made. I'll get pics for this one soon though.

Pics are above, and here is some more reading on nutrient disorders...

Nutrient Disorders
Nutrient disorders are caused by too much or too little of one or several nutrients being available. These nutrients are made available between a pH range of 5 and 7 and a total dissolved solids (TDS) range of 800 to 3000 PPM. Maintaining these conditions is the key to proper nutrient uptake.               
  Nutrients Over twenty elements are needed for a plant to grow. Carbon, hydrogen and oxygen are absorbed from the air and water. The rest of the elements, called mineral nutrients, are dissolved in the nutrient solution. The primary or macro- nutrients (nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K)) are the elements plants use the most. Calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) are secondary nutrients and used in smaller amounts. Iron (Fe), sulfur (S), manganese (Mn), boron (B), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) are micro-nutrients or trace elements. Trace elements are found in most soils. Rockwool (hydroponic) fertilizers must contain these trace elements, as they do not normally exist in sufficient quantities in rockwool or water. Other elements also play a part in plant growth. Aluminum, chlorine, cobalt, iodine, selenium, silicon, sodium and vanadium are not normally included in nutrient mixes. They are required in very minute amounts that are usually present as impurities in the water supply or mixed along with other nutrients.
      *NOTE: The nutrients must be soluble (able to be dissolved in water) and go into solution.

  Macro-nutrients Nitrogen (N) is primary to plant growth. Plants convert nitrogen to make proteins essential to new cell growth. Nitrogen is mainly responsible for leaf and stem growth as well as overall size and vigor. Nitrogen moves easily to active young buds, shoots and leaves and slower to older leaves. Deficiency signs show first in older leaves. They turn a pale yellow and may die. New growth becomes weak and spindly. An abundance of nitrogen will cause soft, weak growth and even delay flower and fruit production if it is allowed to accumulate.             

Phosphorus (P) is necessary for photosynthesis and works as a catalyst for energy transfer within the plant. Phosphorus helps build strong roots and is vital for flower and seed production. Highest levels of phosphorus are used during germination, seedling growth and flowering. Deficiencies will show in older leaves first. Leaves turn deep green on a uniformly smaller, stunted plant. Leaves show brown or purple spots.
          NOTE: Phosphorus flocculates when concentrated and combined with calcium.
             
Potassium (K) activates the manufacture and movement of sugars and starches, as well as growth by cell division. Potassium increases chlorophyll in foliage and helps regulate stomata openings so plants make better use of light and air. Potassium encourages strong root growth, water uptake and triggers enzymes that fight disease. Potassium is necessary during all stages of growth. It is especially important in the development of fruit. Deficiency signs of potassium are: plants are the tallest and appear healthy. Older leaves mottle and yellow between veins, followed by whole leaves that turn dark yellow and die. Flower and fruit drop are common problems associated with potassium deficiency. Potassium is usually locked out by high salinity.             

  Secondary Nutrients Magnesium (Mg) is found as a central atom in the chlorophyll molecule and is essential to the absorption of light energy. Magnesium aids in the utilization of nutrients, neutralizes acids and toxic compounds produced by the plant. Deficiency signs of magnesium are: Older leaves yellow from the center outward, while veins remain green on deficient plants. Leaf tips and edges may discolor and curl upward. Growing tips turn lime green if the deficiency progresses to the top of the plant.             

Calcium (Ca) is fundamental to cell manufacture and growth. Soil gardeners use dolomite lime, which contains calcium and magnesium, to keep the soil sweet or buffered. Rockwool gardeners use calcium to buffer excess nutrients. Calcium moves slowly within the plant and tends to concentrate in roots and older growth. Consequently young growth shows deficiency signs first. Deficient leaf tips, edges and new growth will turn brown and die back. If too much calcium is applied early in life, it will stunt growth as well. It will also flocculate when a concentrated form is combined with potassium.       

    Trace Elements Sulphur (S) is a component of plant proteins and plays a role in root growth and chlorophyll supply. Distributed relatively evenly with largest amounts in leaves which affects the flavor and odor in many plants. Sulphur, like calcium, moves little within plant tissue and the first signs of a deficiency are pale young leaves. Growth is slow but leaves tend to get brittle and stay narrower than normal.           

Iron (Fe) is a key catalyst in chlorophyll production and is used in photosynthesis. A lack of iron turns leaves pale yellow or white while the veins remain green. Iron is difficult for plants to absorb and moves slowly within the plant. Always use chelated (immediately available to the plant) iron in nutrient mixes.               

  Manganese (Mg) works with plant enzymes to reduce nitrates before producing proteins. A lack of manganese turns young leaves a mottled yellow or brown.
             
Zinc (Z) is a catalyst and must be present in minute amounts for plant growth. A lack of zinc results in stunting, yellowing and curling of small leaves. An excess of zinc is uncommon but very toxic and causes wilting or death.
             
  Copper (C) is a catalyst for several enzymes. A shortage of copper makes new growth wilt and
causes irregular growth. Excesses of copper causes sudden death. Copper is also used as a fungicide and wards off insects and diseases because of this property.               

    Boron (B) is necessary for cells to divide and protein formation. It also plays an active role in
pollination and seed production.

    Molybdenum (Mn) helps form proteins and aids the plant's ability to fix nitrogen from the air. A
  deficiency causes leaves to turn pale and fringes to appear scorched. Irregular leaf growth may also result.

  These nutrients are mixed together to form a complete plant fertilizer. The mix contains all the nutrients in the proper ratios to give plants all they need for lush, rapid growth. The fertilizer is
dissolved in water to make a nutrient solution. Water transports these soluble nutrients into contact with the plant roots. In the presence of oxygen and water, the nutrients are absorbed through the root hairs.
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The above text is excerpted from George Van Pattens' excellent book "Gardening: The Rockwool Book".


Edited by lilmafia513 (06/02/09 07:28 PM)


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InvisibleHarry_Ba11sachM
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #235022 - 06/01/09 03:41 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Dude you CAN'T do too much. I'm stoked as shit to see another experience grower here. We have 4 or 5 people with tons of knowledge, but they're not around very much. They just kind of check in occasionally to answer questions.  and like you said it's still pretty new here, so we need some more info to try and get the user base increased. Please, please post away!

Oh yeah, and invite all your friends :smile:


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Offlinelilmafia513
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Harry_Ba11sach]
    #235028 - 06/01/09 03:50 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

well i was brought here by tonysopran....i believe you met him already in the hempy bucket thread. Good friend of mine and has a very similar grow to me.....i just dont want people to think that there is another newb trying to act like he knows more than everybody else. I can still learn from newbs, cuz they have new ideas. I dont get into the status and rep points on these sites, just to spread the word and "Overgrow" the community as mch as possible!!


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OfflineJohnny420


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Harry_Ba11sach]
    #235035 - 06/01/09 04:00 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

I'm interested to see the finished one when you got all the pics up. Problems with your plants is one of the hardest things to get to grips with i think. This seems to be of great use to me right now. thank you!


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:jah: :baggy: WE HIT THE TREES TILL WE LOOK VIETNAMESE :baggy: :jah:


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Johnny420]
    #235039 - 06/01/09 04:03 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

:thumbup:


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Harry_Ba11sach]
    #235313 - 06/02/09 12:42 AM (5 years, 4 months ago)

wow so i just learned that this guy Pong on here is a douche bag.....
Just thought i'd spread the word!
Dude is embarrassed cuz i told him he was fool of shit!LOL!!!
I dont want to waste my time here if this is the great reward for sharing my information with people.


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InvisibleHarry_Ba11sachM
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #235316 - 06/02/09 12:48 AM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Yes, I don't know what's got in to him the last couple days. I've issued him an official warning, if he keeps it up he'll be banned.


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Harry_Ba11sach]
    #235323 - 06/02/09 12:55 AM (5 years, 4 months ago)

I dont know what he took so wrong, i misunderstood him earlier and he went all psycho-jealous teenager on me. Gave me a negative rating and said "Failed".
Who is he? The creator of all pot growers and ganja land? LOL!!

I'm here to help if its needed, i told you earlier. I am busy though with other things so it might take me awhile to get it all posted.

Ive been busy on here today.....:crazy2:


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OfflineIntegra21
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #235403 - 06/02/09 02:55 AM (5 years, 4 months ago)

I like the info, but pics would make it so much better. Here's a chart I made that i though would be helpful for a girl i have babysitting my plants in a couple of months(out of state wedding to go to) Just good general guidelines, actually i have 3 charts made, so i'll put them all up. I just printed these on photo paper for moisture resistance.


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Integra21]
    #235528 - 06/02/09 01:32 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Quote:

Integra21 said:
I like the info, but pics would make it so much better. Here's a chart I made that i though would be helpful for a girl i have babysitting my plants in a couple of months(out of state wedding to go to) Just good general guidelines, actually i have 3 charts made, so i'll put them all up. I just printed these on photo paper for moisture resistance.




Hey man, thanks for the pics......Could you be able to post up some of the cloning pics in my cloning 101 thread i posted yesterday.
I dont have a good enough camera hand to take pics while i cut clones.
The info is there, if you want to post the pics, that would be awesome.
Thanks again..
lilmafia513


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #235530 - 06/02/09 01:36 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

i love the security checklist.....its all so important to think about if you grow at home...

I would reccomend looking into other options outside you home if its possible. You sleep much better at night knowing there is nothing in your house. But then you have to involve other people if you go the other route.

Nice  info.!!


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #235639 - 06/02/09 07:30 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Ok, guys i have edited and added pics to the above post, and also added some reading in the above post's.

Enjoy.


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OfflineAudz

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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #236402 - 06/04/09 02:27 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Good stuff man, I'd 5/5 rate you if I could!


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: Audz]
    #237657 - 06/08/09 05:28 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

Quote:

Audz said:
Good stuff man, I'd 5/5 rate you if I could!



just remember me in two more post...LOL!!


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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #238670 - 06/11/09 07:05 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)
Log in to view attachment

For those of you that want a copy to print off easier, i'll try and upload the checklist to an attachment and see what happens.

Here we go.....


EDIT:  OK it worked, click the link above in green. Click on open, or save if you want to save a copy.


Edited by lilmafia513 (06/11/09 07:08 PM)


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Offlineblunt master
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: lilmafia513]
    #239712 - 06/14/09 08:57 PM (5 years, 4 months ago)

legit
:thumbup:


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OfflineMr HugeBlunts

Registered: 02/02/09
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Re: marijuana plant problem solver......follow the steps to fix the crop!! [Re: blunt master]
    #243229 - 06/26/09 03:26 PM (5 years, 3 months ago)

Please give credit where credit is due. It's fairly obvious that you didn't write/make anything you just posted.

The problem solver is word for word copied from the site below.
http://www.greenmanspage.com/guides/nutrientdisorders.html

http://www.greenmanspage.com/guides/

If you want to seem cool and impress some people, grow some weed, post a journal. Help others out and write original material, plagiarism isn't cool.


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